Northern Tassie Tour – Preparation

Our plan this tour is to ride short distances between camps, thus giving ourselves time to savour the ride, take pictures and not get too stuffed by the actual riding. But, before we get to that …. something completely different!

Yesterday Longford hosted a Tasmanian event, tenuously connected with cycling. The event was the start of a series of celebrations marking 150 years of rail in Tasmania – with the running of an engine (a double header actually) over the Longford railway bridge.

Colin and I attended because we understood there would be reference to the extension of the shared path to Longford, the one that currently ends at Pateena Road. At the moment we have to cycle an extremely narrow part of the 100kph limit Illawarra Road over the South Esk bridges in order to get to the start of the shared path into Perth. We will be travelling the gauntlet tomorrow to start our Northern Tassie Tour.

Queen Victoria and her Transport Minister arrived
Her Madge kindly posed for a photograph to embellish this Blog
While Colin discussed cycling with an old bloke who apparently rules – when HM is not here?

During the speeches, Councillor Dick Adams did indeed talk about the possibility of using the rail corridor to support a shared path to provide people with walking and cycling access between Longford and Perth. The Minister nodded wisely. Will this be the last we hear of it? Will a shared path be on the cards when the Illawarra Road is upgraded? Anything is possible. I do hope it goes ahead.

Brompton had a rest while the engine waiting for the “Go” signal

The engine hooted and cleared the single track line for a goods train due shortly; Colin and I headed off for a coffee.


During the rest of the day I continued to prep the trike for the tour. I have squeezed the canopy plus 4 panniers onto it – and packed the canopy bag in case it self-destructs in the winds. After getting the main bits and pieces together (tent, sleeping bag etc) I kept remembering other items to take along, so it was an all afternoon exercise.

Getting loaded. Why do I need so much stuff? Must be an age thing.
Not exactly lightweight bike packing going one here!

I chose the Magnum because it has multiple stars against “Touring” in the glossy literature. So far they have proved their worth, riding comfortably with a great load, albeit slowly.

I will post our progress on a day by day basis but, this time, I will start on our return. That way I will be able to include the best pictures and movies together with maps of where we actually went – not where we plan to go.

Next blog post – circa 20/21 February. See you then!

Author: antc1946

Born in 1946 I learnt to cycle about 10 years later. On a bike with rods connecting brake levers to the brakes - anyone remember those? I emigrated to Australia (from the UK) in 1974 and moved to Tasmania in 1984. Bicycles were in my life for most of that time although sometimes they were replaced by motorised two wheels for a bit more excitement. On reaching 70 I decided to stick to pedal power but in 2019 an electric recumbent made an appearance. It is good!

3 thoughts on “Northern Tassie Tour – Preparation”

  1. Yes, the Magnums have it ! ALL. I still ride your “old red one” that you rode to Adelaide, known as Red Magnum 1.”
    She never misses a beat, even with a full touring load on. Looking forward to hitting the trail again (300ks plus) this time.
    A bike trail / walkway would be fantastic over the river.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Great to see you all prepped for the tour! I was happy to see your last post as all had been quiet down that way for a bit. I hope all goes well and the canopy remains a canopy instead of a sail. (If you keep working on that, you could end up with a velomobile!). Wishing you tailwinds, courteous traffic and a safe tour!

    Liked by 1 person

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